Demodex Mites

Demodex Treatment Tips: Limiting Their Access to Food

demodex mite
Reading Time: 8 minutes

Since Demodex mites have an undeniable role in causing and worsening skin conditions, identifying what they eat may help to treat them by restricting their access to food.

Every living creature needs fitting conditions for survival and reproduction. One of these requirements is adequate food. As long as there is an abundance of food around, it is practically impossible to control them and get rid of the concerns they create.

This article examines the nutrients Demodex mites need and how you can stop them from growing too dense by using simple approaches. Yet, before getting into that, it’s helpful to know a little about these pests and the issues they cause.

The following article discusses the rosacea, its causes, and its connection with Demodex mites. Subsequently, we offer a practical, simple solution to manage Demodex-related rosacea.

Meet Your Mites

Demodex mites are tiny parasites that can affect the human skin as well as other mammals and produce numerous complications. Essentially, each adult human alive has a small number of these mites living on them. Although they are harmful even in low densities, Demodex-related issues usually remain asymptomatic as long as their number is less than 5 per square centimetre of surface.   So far, about 65 varieties of Demodex have been discovered that dwell in or near mammalian pilosebaceous units. Luckily, these mites are species-specific, and only two kinds can survive on human skin: Demodex brevis and Demodex folliculorum. This indicates that a contagious dog cannot spread the parasites to you and vice-versa.    Demodex parasites are less than half a millimetre long. They usually measure within 0.2 to 0.4 millimetres and live in groups. The mites have semi-transparent trunks and can creep on the skin and under it using their small segmented feet. Under the microscope, they resemble fat worms. Yet, unlike common worms, Demodex mites are not safe. They continually move on the skin and spread germs deep into your skin or expand them to a larger area.

What Do Demodex Consume?

Demodex mites’ primary food is oils. Wherever there is more grease, they have higher survival and proliferation odds. This oil can be sebum or grease provided by external sources like makeups, cosmetics, creams, shampoos, etc. In other words, individuals with greasy skin (such as adolescents) or who consume oily foods are more prone to Demodex-related issues. Also, oil gland-rich areas of the skin, such as the scalp, cheeks, forehead, chin, and back, are more likely to develop Demodex infection. On the other hand, beautifiers and other skincare products provide the mites with extra food supplies to reproduce.   So if you do not want to provide additional food to these nasty pests, follow these simple tips:  

  • Do not apply oily beautifiers and other skincare products.
  • If your skin is extremely oily, see a dermatologist to keep it under check.
  • Avoid oily foods and greasy convenience food.
  • If your skin is dry, use a small amount of ultra virgin cold-pressed coconut oil to lubricate it. In contrast to other lubricants, coconut doesn’t nourish Demodex.
  • If your skin is dirty, apply a gentle natural cleanser to clean it. DDC is a great option. This shampoo does not feed Demodex and even eliminates them.

Important note:

Never try to wipe your normal skin oil by overusing soaps and other cleansers. This will harm your skin barrier and replenish Demodex with more opportunities to survive. If your skin is extremely greasy, see a good dermatologist control it by addressing the root cause.   Although oils are the major food of Demodex mites, they can consume vitamins, minerals, and amino acids. So if you carry a large population of them, even oil-free beautifiers can help them grow their population. Demodex gain nourishment from the vitamins, minerals and other nutrients found in creams, sunscreens, shampoos and cosmetics. When their population grows, they generate various issues for your skin and hair.

More Nutrients, Fuel The Mites Life Cycle

Female Demodex mites have a vaginal hole for internal fertilization. They multiply by depositing eggs. These mites have sexual intercourse on the skin or near it and then go down to put their eggs near the follicles and oil glands. Demodex can increase very speedily. Each female deposits dozens of heart-shaped eggs that hatch into the small Demodex mites in a few days. These larvae crawl up to the surface. When they reach outside, they become adults and can reproduce like their parents. Their accelerated life cycle raises the importance of the nutrients they can reach. These pests can increase very quickly under favourable circumstances and on different parts of the skin.

The Role of Immunity in Demodex Treatment

Beyond access to food, the natural defence plays an important role in keeping Demodex density under check. A healthy immune system doesn’t let microorganisms, including Demodex mites, go under the radar. However, in the case of any immunodeficiency issues (such as genetic defects, HIV or taking immunosuppressive medications), Demodex parasites have more opportunities to develop and reproduce. In this scenario, if they can reach sufficient food, they proliferate very quickly and result in numerous hair and skin issues.   We should note that immunodeficiency may not be systemic; it can only hit the skin. For instance, over-washing the skin with cleansers can break down the skin barrier, decrease its immunity, and provide a good chance for germs and parasites.  

Demodex Mites Related Issues

Many people don’t know they are infected with Demodex. However, the mites may cause or exacerbate skin issues when they grow too much. They manifest themselves with symptoms such as rosacea, itching, crawling sensation, seborrheic dermatitis, pruritus at night, hair falling, blepharitis, alopecia, dandruff, enlarged skin pores, fungal acne, redness of the eyes and around it, crawling sensations on the scalp, eyelash issues, and resistant acne.  

How to Treat the Demodex Related Problems

The initial step in controlling Demodex-related issues is to ensure there are many parasites on your skin. Demodex can imitate or worsen some prevalent skin complications. That’s why you should make sure the mite is what begins or worsens your current symptoms.   Demodex diagnosis is usually performed in two ways:  

  • Clinical microscopic test
  • Online test

Demodex Microscopic Test (Standardized Skin Surface Biopsy)

In Standardized skin surface biopsy (SSSB), the dermatologist uses a specific adhesive tape to remove the top layer of the skin. Your doctor sends this sample to the lab to count its Demodex mites under the microscope. If SSSB results show a meaningful number of parasites, there is a great possibility your skin and hair concerns are linked to Demodex.   Although the microscopic test is based on observation, the counted number of mites are not always correct. Demodex primary food is oil. So if your skin is greasy, most of the mites come up to the surface. On the other hand, these parasites crawl down to the deep layers to seek food if you have dry skin. That’s why the results of SSSB of two people who have the same population of Demodex, one with greasy skin and the other with dry skin, can be entirely different.   Another point about these pests is their response to light. They avoid sunlight. So if you walk to your dermatologist’s office on a bright day, he can probably find only a few of them, as the others have taken refuge under the surface. Demodex superficial density changes at different times of the day, making microscopic testing unreliable. In Standardized skin surface biopsy (SSSB), the dermatologist uses a specific adhesive tape to remove the top layer of the skin. Your doctor sends this sample to the lab to count its Demodex mites under the microscope. If SSSB results show a meaningful number of parasites, there is a great possibility your skin and hair concerns are linked to Demodex.   Although the microscopic test is based on observation, the counted number of mites are not always correct. Demodex primary food is oil. So if your skin is greasy, most of the mites come up to the surface. On the other hand, these parasites crawl down to the deep layers to seek food if you have dry skin. That’s why the results of SSSB of two people who have the same population of Demodex, one with greasy skin and the other with dry skin, can be entirely different.   Another point about these pests is their response to light. They avoid sunlight. So if you walk to your dermatologist’s office on a bright day, he can probably find only a few of them, as the others have taken refuge under the surface. Demodex superficial density changes at different times of the day, making microscopic testing unreliable.  

Demodex Mites Online Quiz
Find Your Results in Just 5 Minutes! Most people have found the results of their Demodex population density by answering these carefully crafted questions.

Demodex Online Test

Another method for estimating Demodex mites’ density is online testing, which is more reliable, repeatable, less aggressive and more efficient than the former.   The online Demodex diagnostic quiz is based on the mites’ symptoms and the chances you have given them to increase. The age range, skin type, health concerns, lifestyle, immunity and other factors impacting the Demodex growth are reflected in the results – the feature that microscopic testing lacks.   This practical test is provided exclusively by Ungex, and we are qualified in interpreting the results. Online testing is free of charge.   Because Demodex pests are infectious, we recommend that all members of your family take the test, even if they don’t show any related symptoms. They may be asymptomatic vectors of Demodex mites.   Please click on the link if you would like to participate in the Demodex online quiz. demodex mites-review6

OZiDEX Demodex Mite Treatment

Numerous researchers worldwide have studied Demodex mites related subjects, such as their life span and how they harm skin issues. For instance, Dr Fabien Forton, a dermatologist and hair expert in Brussels, has achieved the following over the years of studies about skin issues such as rosacea:

“Most scholars still think that increase of the Demodex mite in rosacea patients is a secondary issue, an epiphenomenon, or an aggravating factor in which the initial infection increases the proliferation of Demodex, which then worsens the condition. However, many studies suggest that the Demodex mite may directly cause the early inflammatory process.”

Moreover, Dr Martin Schuler of the Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich has achieved the following outcomes:

“The large population of Demodex mites produces severe infection in the skin and hair, which is referred to as Demodicosis. Studies imply that although Demodicosis may present symptoms similar to rosacea, it does not answer common and primary rosacea medications.

Ozidex Effective Approach

Several approaches have been introduced for Demodex treatment. Yet, many of them contain chemical ingredients or harm the skin in the long run, such as tea tree oil. To get rid of these nasty mites, we suggest PROCUTiN spray, a wholly natural and side-effect-free product of OZiDEX. PROCUTiN eliminates Demodex mites without harming the skin. If you are suffering from Demodex-related problems on your hair, you can also purchase DHT tonic, a unique product of Ungex (the older brand that OZiDEX is the latest brand within its family). This product reduces Demodex and supports your scalp with nutrients. You can also use DDC to wash your skin when it’s dirty. DDC doesn’t feed Demodex and even harm the mites with its antiparasitic components.   OZiDEX and Ungex products both offer a unique protocol that helps you improve your lifestyle to limit Demodex mites’ food, raise your immunity and stop these mites from spreading to others. Adherence to the guidance protects you from Demodex recurrence and its associated concerns.  

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